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I am Sandra - faithful steward. listener. shepherd. dream believer. hard worker. collects brass bells, boots. Jesus follower. contented. star gazer. homemaker. farmer. prayer warrior. country woman. reader. traveler. writer. homebody. living life large.

Friday, October 06, 2006

Romania & Autumn

Life on a farm is hectic most days but especially, or so it seems, during the autumn months. Getting everything ready for the snow, wind, rain, cold; making sure the animals have shelter, getting the last of the hay put up. All this and more take up time, lots and lots of time, and still everyday living has to be scrunched in there as well.

The barns are almost finished being re-sided and they look great. The stables dates to before the War Between the States while some of the other buildings are a bit newer. We're quite pleased with the results and are now working to get some lofts ready for hay, a small fiber studio prepared for winter, some run-in shelter's for one open pasture and a few other things.

One things for certain, work on a farm is never completed. One just reaches a stopping point and then...stops. Rest, relaxation and worship are just as important as work, perhaps more so when one is weary or faith is wavering.

Leslie and I traveled to McLean, VA for a small festival last weekend and it would have been a much nicer venue had the weather cooperated. We had cold, wind and rain and the turnout was quite small; probably fewer than 500 people...much fewer. It was disappointing, especially considering the twelve hour round trip drive, week of preparation, loss from home and job and all the other things that go lacking when I'm off the farm.


Last week I dyed some of the Romney Shetland blended yarn, some Romney Shetland Mohair yarn and some plain, as in down breed, yarn. The natural colored brownish gray Romney Shetland blend had the richest depth of color. The brown, gray and black blend from both the Romney and the Shetland sheep had such a sheen and lustre and the light virtually dances across the yarn. For most of it I used Jacquard dyes but for two skeins I used walnut with an alum mordant. That result was simply beautiful! There's a dance going on with the various browns that leads the eye on a merry chase.

I'm in process of gathering more walnuts which are abundant around here. There are several trees within a mile and all I have to do is take a bag and gather the nuts before the squirrels get to them.

A closing teaser for you...the photo of the Granny spinning from a distaff on a drop spindle was taken in August 2006 when I took a fiber trip to Romania. I'm working on an exhibit of historical fiber artifacts such as antique drop spindles, shepherd's vests, distaffs and other items with photographs to travel across the USA. Stay tuned for more photos and a travelogue on Romanian Fiber Femmes and, if you're interested in taking such a trip to see a quickly vanishing way of life, let us know. We're in process of putting together an intimate Romanian Ukrainian Fiber and Craft Tour for August 2007.

Please visit the September October 2006 issue ofFiber Femmes. While you're there, sign up for our FF Newsletter and talk about Fiber Femmes on your blogs.

2 comments:

  1. I want to see a closeup of that spindle!

    ReplyDelete
  2. that sucker does look like a bottom whorl, doesn't it?

    ReplyDelete

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